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Le Cap 2010 - Vidéo du Congrès

Full Session: Bible Exposition - Ephesians 2

Auteur: Ruth Padilla Deborst
Date: 24.09.2010
Category: Réconciliation, Écritures

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L'original est en anglais



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Description: After a brief video and drama presentation, Costa Rican theologian Ruth Padilla DeBorst explains Ephesians 2:1-22. She shows from the passage how we are all dead in our sin, but how we have been raised with Christ for a new, glorious and godly life. She also contrasts the world’s peace with the peace of Christ that is seen in Christian unity.

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Mots-clés: full session, Ephesians, Ruth Padilla DeBorst, reconciliation, Cape Town 2010

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PhContributeBy
Répondre Signaler 0 J'aime Je n'aime pas Elias_Fahur (0)  
Brésil

Answering questions||1.a) Wife, Family, business partner, church.
Prayer- God make agent of yor peace, give me can discern the truth of each one to be an effective agent.
1.b) Facilitate dialogs and bring people at same table to get a concensus.
Bless, understand, to embrace the business.


20.10.2010
PhContributeBy
Répondre Signaler 0 J'aime Je n'aime pas RagamuffinRese (3)  
États-Unis

One group member suggested we use the phrase biblical unity rather than reconciliation. In their context and experience it worked. As our discussion on the matter progressed, others pointed out that reconciliation must precede biblical unity. This is both within the church and outside of it.  Missiologically speaking, we must stick to reconciliation in spirit, word and deed, not only because Christ is God reconciling the world to himself but in non-Christian settings where the Bible has no authority, biblical unity could not be understood.   


20.10.2010
PhContributeBy
Répondre Signaler 0 J'aime Je n'aime pas Zaldy_B (0)  
Philippines

Study on Ephesians 3||I praise GOD for the Spirit-filled, deep and profound study of Ephesians 3 this morning!


20.10.2010
PhContributeBy
Répondre Signaler 0 J'aime Je n'aime pas Zaldy_B (0)  
Philippines

Study on Ephesians 3||I praise GOD for the Spirit-filled, deep and profound study of Ephesians 3 this morning!


20.10.2010
PhContributeBy
Répondre Signaler 0 J'aime Je n'aime pas Julia_L (4)  
Canada

Actually October 20th||THank you - I am surprised at how Mrs. Little was able to do that in her very fresh grief.
I am wondering about the proposition that Dr Piper was giving - I’m not so sure about the balance - overall, I think he’s probably right, but there is a massive propensity in the North American church to pay attention overly much to the evangelization of the lost, and almost ignore "social work" issues. And even when it does, it only deals with small individual issues.
Nothing around systemic reconciliation, nothing around systemic injustices and true, deep systemic change - evangelicals have been very bad at that - how do we speak to social structures, infrastructure, power dynamics, etc that create the social ills that cause problems.


20.10.2010
PhContributeBy
Répondre Signaler 0 J'aime Je n'aime pas Vijay_Minz (0)
Inde

Bible study||Wonderful.
I just wish we had more time. But I can understand the time constrain.


20.10.2010
PhContributeBy
Répondre Signaler 0 J'aime Je n'aime pas Matt_H (0)  
Australie

a growing overarhcing theme for Lausanne III||not quite sure where to send this. I put it in my table group leader feedback and in the general response today. I will keep it in this section tomorrow and the table feedback ...
My first response yesterday raised the possibility of the beginnings of an over-arching theme at Lausanne III: that we need to hold far more loosely to our human formed "identities" (not sure if that is the word) as against our oneness in the Lord Jesus. I went on to share that if this is a theme, we will continue to see this develop as we look at the call to humility, integrity, suffering and partnership in responses to the Lord Jesus’ priorities as He builds His church in the years before us.
Day Two has, in my mind, continued to confirm this thought as an over-arching theme, even down to my caution about using the word “identity”. In his presentation on reconciliation out of the Rwanda experience, Antoine Rutayisire’s included this statement as one of the new things that the church in Rwanda has learnt through the experience:
“a new perspective on our identity toward an identity rooted in the Lord Jesus Christ from which the fruit of the Spirit, and not the fruit of the flesh evolves” (my paraphrase)
Further, the call we heard from Ephesians 2 this morning was that God in his grace and mercy has worked that through the Lord Jesus and the cross he is forming a new man from the two, killing (strong word!!) the walls of hostility. The formation of a new man just underlines the reality that our own identities must be subordinate to the new. This was reflected in testimony after testimony I heard about reconciliation, both from the stage and in conversation. Old identities must not be the focus, rather, our new identity in Christ must have precedence.
Further, as we discussed these matters in our table group after Plenary 2, what stuck us was not just what was said, but, as much, what was not said. Namely, that for true reconciliation to come to pass, reconciliation to God and to each other, a great cost must be paid. We see this in the death and resurrection of the Lord Jesus Christ. Further, we see who must pay that cost – those in power and influence. Once again we see this in the Lord Jesus who gave up the ‘Cosmic Christ’ of Ephesians 1 to enter the suffering reconciler in Ephesians 2.
In all our discussions today, even in the multiplex on ethnic diversity – which was great – we have not heard this message: that the powerful and influential must sacrifice the most, express the most generous action, be first to give up what must be given up of their identity, to see God’s gospel ministry of reconciliation come to fruition around the world. As an Australian pastor and perhaps a representation of the powerful, rich and influential, albeit minority, side of the global church I am greatly challenged by this.
Once again I raise the issue for the Congress leadership, will we have the gumption to state that our identities must be subservient to the Lord Jesus? At the Congress to date we have, quite rightly, heard advocates for the poor, outcasts, oppressed and marginalised (slaves in India, the wounded from Rwanda, even the testimony from a wonderfully courageous young North Korean woman – wasn’t that a moment!!), but when will the western church, the rich, the influential, the powerful stand and respond, not so much with contrition and repentance, although there might be place for that, but with a commitment to open-handed generosity, sacrifice and grace?
As I asked yesterday, are there human sacred cows God is challenging here? To put it another way, what areas of identity does this challenge speak to? If tomorrow continues to confirm this theme, it may give a context to outline them too.


19.10.2010
PhContributeBy
Répondre Signaler 0 J'aime Je n'aime pas Chris_C_Sing (3)  
Singapour

Speaking peace||A different presentation. Clearly insightful. Language was a little higher level, more prosaic. Just commenting, that this was probably a little harder to follow for many. But rich for those who could keep up.
A great insight about Christ preaching peace - linked to the creation, and God’s speaking and it happened.
But our group noted that there is a step in the middle - That Christ preached peace, but, just as creation obeyed, we also need to obey that call to peace.
Thanks, I hope to get the video and listen again.


19.10.2010
PhContributeBy
Répondre Signaler 0 J'aime Je n'aime pas Cody_Lorance (13)   
États-Unis

Table Discussion||The God-centeredness of Ephesians has been striking to our group. Particularly in chapter 2, we noted that everything that happens - death to life, salvation, new humanity - all hinges on the nature of God. "But God, who is rich in mercy . . ." The reality of what occurs to us in chapter 2, is a function of God being God and we being caught up in the middle of it.
From this perspective, Ruth’s framework was fitting - God is making a dwelling place for himself. Thus, it also makes sense to speak of the Church’s reconciling work as a function of us being related to Him, of us being His body - the fullness of Him, of incarnation.
Related to this was the observation of a continued use of "in Christ", "with Christ", "through Christ." Also the noting that God has "prepared" this. The futility of circumsicion as type of meritorious "work" - we need Christ.
Several of us also noted the start contrast and parallel of contrasts in chapter 2. What we were and what we are. That this transformation, this grace, this gift should overflow in an evangelical, reconciling, loving engagement with the world - with others who are simply what we once were and could be what we now are.
Finally we noted the concept of peace and togetherness expressed in this passage.
APPLICATION:
We should, at Lausanne, dedicate us anew to bringing many, many more people into God’s family. We must share with those who are still now what we once were.
Reconciliation as a process, requires stories being told - a kind of confession that leads to healing. We must tell what we have done in wronging others. We must say how we have suffered.
God is our peace. It is inherant in His nature. We must be hopeful that peace is possible because that is who our God is.
The Holy Spirit is emphasizing the God-centeredness of the texts we’ve been studying. We don’t as a table yet know what God is saying in this in way of application, but at least we may say that we should be more God-centered in our thinking, praying, serving, everything.
Peace is more that warm and fuzzy. Peace has political implications. Christians must be involved in the "dirty work" of making peace.


19.10.2010
PhContributeBy
Répondre Signaler 0 J'aime Je n'aime pas Julie_anne_Laird (0)  
Australie

Ruth||Awesome talk great example of how to interpret the bible! In our observation our group may have come up with something else.


19.10.2010

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